Nighttime driving can be dangerous

Every year, people in New York associate the fall season with the changing times; Daylight Saving Time comes to an end in November 2018. As time changes reflect shorter winter days, drivers may also experience the dangers that come with fatigue, night vision and rush hour in the dark. Night driving is more dangerous than operating a vehicle at any other time of the day, according to research conducted by the National Safety Council.

Once Daylight Saving Time ends, people are likely to find themselves spending more hours behind the wheel in the dark, sometimes during both their morning and evening commutes. Statistics show that the risk of a deadly car crash is three times greater at night than at any other time. When drivers operate their cars at night, they may be less able to distinguish depth, color and even peripheral vision, putting them in a worse position to respond to emergency situations. Even headlights from oncoming vehicles can interfere with vision in some cases, especially when high-beam headlights are used.

Drivers can take action to combat the effects of darkness on highway safety. Headlights should be aimed correctly; it’s important to make sure they are fully functional. Inside the car, dimming the gauges, entertainment system and other bright dashboard light can improve the road’s visibility. Cleaning the windshield to avoid streaks is particularly important at night. In addition, vision weaknesses are exacerbated in the dark; drivers should make sure to get regular eye exams.

At any time of day, negligent, dangerous and distracted drivers can pose a serious risk to others on the road. Car accidentscan lead to severe injuries or even death. People who have been injured due to another’s negligence might be able to seek compensation for their damages, including medical bills and lost wages, by working with a personal injury lawyer.